Friday, May 30, 2008

Alert! Protest Rally Against Renewed JFK Cat Killings! Tue Jun 3

from Neighborhood Cats -

Note: Please send any questions or comments to the Mayor's Alliance for NYC's Animals at email: info@animalalliancenyc.org .

SAVE JFK CATS FROM LATEST ROUNDUP

As reported by amNew York, The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has resumed its cruel and ineffective feral cat extermination program at JFK Airport and plans to begin roundups this week - http://www.amny.com/news/local/am-cats0528,0,779317.story

Please contact the decision-makers below to help save the JFK cats and join us for a rally next Tuesday, June 3rd at Port Authority headquarters near Union Square in Manhattan!

RALLY TO SAVE JFK CATS
Tuesday, June 3, 2008
11:15am to 1pm – Rain or Shine
Port Authority headquarters at Union Square
225 Park Avenue South, between 18th and 19th Streets in Manhattan

Please call and write the following and urge them to immediately stop the roundups at JFK Airport and work with local animal protection groups to implement a Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) program.

Christopher O. Ward, Executive Director
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
225 Park Avenue South, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10003

Port Authority Corporate Headquarters
General: (212) 435-7000
Public Affairs: (212) 435-7777
(Get a live person on the line and demand to speak to someone about the JFK situation - keep calling until they respond)
Fax: (212) 435-4032

Anthony R. Coscia, Chairman
Board of Commissioners
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Phone: 732.846.2120 (direct line)
732-846-7600 (this is the general number for Mr. Coscia's law firm)
Fax: 732.846.8877

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Differentiation of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccination, Infection, or Vaccination and Infection in Cats

Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume 22 Issue 2 Page 330-334, March–April 2008

To cite this article: J.K. Levy, P.C. Crawford, H. Kusuhara, K. Motokawa, T. Gemma, R. Watanabe, S. Arai, D. Bienzle, T. Hohdatsu (2008) Differentiation of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccination, Infection, or Vaccination and Infection in Cats
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 22 (2) , 330–334 doi:10.1111/j.1939-1676.2008.0078.x

Abstract
Differentiation of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccination, Infection, or Vaccination and Infection in Cats

J.K. Levy11Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; ,
P.C. Crawford11Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; ,
H. Kusuhara22Research Center for Biologicals, The Kitasato Institute, Kitamoto, Saitama, Japan; ,
K. Motokawa22Research Center for Biologicals, The Kitasato Institute, Kitamoto, Saitama, Japan; ,
T. Gemma22Research Center for Biologicals, The Kitasato Institute, Kitamoto, Saitama, Japan; ,
R. Watanabe22Research Center for Biologicals, The Kitasato Institute, Kitamoto, Saitama, Japan; ,
S. Arai22Research Center for Biologicals, The Kitasato Institute, Kitamoto, Saitama, Japan; ,
D. Bienzle33Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, ON, Canada; and , and
T. Hohdatsu44Laboratory of Veterinary Infectious Disease, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Towada, Aomori, Japan
1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; 2Research Center for Biologicals, The Kitasato Institute, Kitamoto, Saitama, Japan; 3Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, ON, Canada; and 4Laboratory of Veterinary Infectious Disease, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Towada, Aomori, Japan
Reported in part at the 144th Meeting of the Japanese Society of Veterinary Science, Ebetsu, Japan, September 2–4, 2007 (abstract).
Corresponding author: Dr Julie Levy, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, 2015 SW 16th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32610; e-mail: levyj@vetmed.ufl.edu.

Abstract

Background: Serodiagnosis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is complicated by the use of a formalin-inactivated whole-virus FIV vaccine. Cats respond to immunization with antibodies indistinguishable from those produced during natural infection by currently available diagnostic tests, which are unable to distinguish cats that are vaccinated against FIV, infected with FIV, or both.

Hypothesis: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detecting antibodies against formalin-treated FIV whole virus and untreated transmembrane peptide will distinguish uninfected from infected cats, regardless of vaccination status.

Animals: Blood samples were evaluated from uninfected unvaccinated cats (n = 73 samples), uninfected FIV-vaccinated cats (n = 89), and FIV-infected cats (n = 102, including 3 from cats that were also vaccinated).

Methods: The true status of each sample was determined by virus isolation. Plasma samples were tested for FIV antibodies by a commercial FIV diagnostic assay and an experimental discriminant ELISA.

Results: All samples from uninfected cats were correctly identified by the discriminant ELISA (specificity 100%). Of the samples collected from FIV-infected cats, 99 were correctly identified as FIV-infected (sensitivity 97.1%).
Conclusions and Clinical Importance: With the exception of viral isolation, the discriminant ELISA is the most reliable assay for diagnosis of FIV. A practical strategy for the diagnosis of FIV infection would be to use existing commercial FIV antibody assays as screening tests. Negative results with commercial assays are highly reliable predictors for lack of infection. Positive results can be confirmed with the discriminant ELISA. If the discriminant ELISA is negative, the cat is probably vaccinated against FIV but not infected. Positive results are likely to represent infection.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2008.0078.x

Sunday, May 18, 2008

Improving Interactions between Animal Rights Groups and Conservation Biologists

Conservation Biology
Volume 22 Issue 1 Page 27-35, February 2008
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2007.00845.x

To cite this article: DAN PERRY, GAD PERRY (2008) Improving Interactions between Animal Rights Groups and Conservation Biologists
Conservation Biology 22 (1) , 27–35 doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2007.00845.x

Abstract
Essay
Improving Interactions between Animal Rights Groups and Conservation Biologists

DAN PERRY**Interdisciplinary Program in Science, Technology & Society, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel AND
GAD PERRY††Department of Natural Resource Management, Box 42125, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2125, U.S.A., email gad.perry@ttu.edu
*Interdisciplinary Program in Science, Technology & Society, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel †Department of Natural Resource Management, Box 42125, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-2125, U.S.A., email gad.perry@ttu.edu
†Address correspondence to G. Perry.

Abstract

Abstract: Invasive species are often considered to be a major threat to biodiversity, leading conservation biologists to often recommend their complete eradication. Animal rights groups typically categorically oppose killing animals, and their opposition has brought eradication attempts of gray squirrels in northern Italy (Europe) and mute swans in Vermont to a halt. As a result native red squirrels may disappear from Europe and ecosystem-wide impacts are expected to be caused by the swan. In contrast, cooperation between managers and animal rights groups has resulted in a successful control program for feral pigs in Fort Worth, Texas (U.S.A.). The philosophical differences between animal rights and conservation biologists' views make cooperation seem unlikely, yet documented cases of cooperation have been beneficial for both groups. We recommend that managers dealing with invasive species should consult with social scientists and ethicists to gain a better understanding of the implications of some of their policy decisions. In addition, we recommend that animal rights groups do more to support alternatives to lethal control, which are often excluded by economic limitations. Prevention of arrival of invasive species via application of the precautionary principle may be an especially productive avenue for such collaboration because it fits the goals and values of both groups.


Appreciate your article, Dan and Gad! AnimalResources and Feral Cats in the News ~ the Feral Cat Blog! has worked to connect and promote diverse groups or individuals, encourage partnerships and initiatives to attain common goals -- where methods are non-lethal.

In the particular case of feral cats who are not mentioned in this article -- at this time in history -- for projects where it is believed that non-lethal removal (and therefore relocation) or exclusion is the only solution, additional funds and effort will have to be contributed by the group(s) requesting or supporting removal; more cannot be expected or obtained from trap-neuter-return groups and individuals; they simply don't have it.

See a short list of feral cat and wildlife partnerships on Cat Management in Communities [ http://catmanagement.blogspot.com ] under Trap-Neuter-Return and Wildlife.

For domestic and feral cats, couldn't agree more with the concept of prevention. This includes addressing 'owned' cat issues while simultaneously treating unowned cat issues via Trap-Neuter-Return-Manage (TNRM.) Several years ago I reviewed and was interested in parts of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Species Survival Council (SSC) policy on prevention. Will have to read more of the still controversial but more recent Precautionary Principle Project.

Saturday, May 17, 2008

Holistic Healthcare for Pets Summer Courses

from Prince Georges Feral Friends:


Hello,

The early registration price has been extended four days, through May 19, for postmarked or online registration. There are courses for veterinarians as well as lay persons, for beginners as well as advanced students.

Concerned about poisons in pet food? Learn about Real Food for Real Pets from Jennifer (Aunt Jeni) Boniface. Holding an MS in Animal Nutrition, she will explain nutritional requirements of our pets, and the results of deficiencies as well as the difference between commercial pet foods and a species appropriate diet. She will give helpful hints about transitioning to a better diet.

Traditional Chinese Medicine is an ancient healing modality. It continues to be effective with little change after thousands of years. You will learn about the Five Elements, Yin and Yang, Meridians, Food Therapy, among other things. You will hear about case studies and learn some acupressure points that you can use on your own pets. Our team of instructors consists of Dr Scott Sanderson and Dr Alison Key, both certified in TCM.

"Like Cures Like" and you will learn how to use this principle from Dr Christina Chambreau in our Homeopathic Animal Care courses. Dr Chambreau is co-founder of the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy and has been using Homeopathy exclusively for 20 years. A series of courses begins with an Introduction (2 days) which gives you a basic understanding the Holistic paradigm, and of Homeopathy and other holistic modalities. The Intermediate course (4 days) goes in depth into the process of case taking and recognizing important symptoms, use of your own copies of the reference books to select an appropriate remedy, how to determine potency, administer the remedy, and evaluate the response. An additional day of case studies illustrates the process that was learned in the previous courses. After the seven days, companion animals caretakers or animal rescue workers can learn to use homeopathy or will be much more able to work with a holistic veterinarian on their animals' illnesses. A veterinarian can begin to use homeopathy in his/her practice.

Advanced Homeopathy students with a year or more of experience with cases, can benefit from the Advanced Case Studies courses (two 2-day courses, take one or the other or both). Bring your cases, cured or not, and work with a team to determine what to do next. This course is also led by Dr Chambreau.

Although these courses are held in Maryland, because of their uniqueness and value, about half of the students come from out-of-state -- from as far away as the west coast and from outside of the USA. Fly to Baltimore/Washington International and stay at accommodations near the class location. We will help you to feel at home.

More information, the calendar, online registration, the book list, and information about accommodations is at http://www.HolisticHealthCareForPets.org

--

Tim Saffell -- TimSaffell@USA.Net

Prince Georges Feral Friends, SPCA, Inc.
PO Box 1036, Bowie, MD 20718
http://www.PGFerals.Org/

Monday, May 12, 2008

Trap Neuter Return training 2008

Training and Events for Cat Advocacy, Cat Management,
Trap-Neuter-Return-Manage, and Spay/Neuter
http://catandtnrevents.blogspot.com/

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